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Katanga - updates


May-September 2008

This report is the third, and for the moment last, in a series of updates following the initial report of June 2007 “Mapping Interests in Conflict Areas: Katanga” (for the first and second update, see below). The information for the updates is drawn from permanent field research carried out by four Katangese NGOs. These NGOs are based in different parts of Katanga and their research activities for this project cover the militarised territories of the province.


1) The briefing paper

A PDF version of the paper is available below. If you want to open it in a separate window, right click on the hyperlink.

Read the paper (English) (PDF, 549 kB)

Pour lire le rapport (français) (PDF, 556 kB)



2) The web maps

Accurate and complete cartographic material on the Democratic Republic of Congo is rare or even non-existent. The main cartographic source for our maps is the so-called “Référentiel Géographique Commun”, a project in progress, completed with data from the collection of the Royal Museum for Central Africa in Tervuren (RMCA/KMMA). The ‘Natural resources’ map is based on the same Museum’s “Mineral occurrences database and GIS map of the Democratic Republic of Congo”, 2004.

IPIS has published an updated version of the FARDC and Mayi-Mayi maps. Because of the preponderant role of natural resources as a motivating factor for the armed groups and the FARDC, we have produced a web map combining the maps ‘Conflict actors’ and ‘Natural resources’. Recently discovered mining areas that have become a security issue have been added to the ‘Natural resources’ map.
The completely new Incidents map shows the important security incidents involving armed groups or FARDC for the period May to September 2008.
Our information on positions and incidents in the Mitwaba territory is more detailed than that regarding the other Katangese territories.

Due to the lack of reliable and complete cartographical data, the location of the following places is approximate: Kisengo (‘Natural resources’ and ‘Incidents’), Kilunga and Mulunguyi (‘Natural resources’), Kintya (‘Mayi-Mayi’), Wimbi (‘Mayi-Mayi’ and ‘Incidents’). Information regarding other places that could not be located was attached to the capital of the territory, or to a known place close-by.


How to use the web maps:

The link below will lead you to a webpage with 5 different maps that can be selected from the drop down menu on the right side of the screen.

  • You can change the level of detail on the maps by zooming in or out. The maps are available at three different scales: 1:7,500,000 (initial view), 1:3,000,000 and 1:1,000,000. To zoom in or out, move the scroll slide (in the bottom left corner) up or down, or just move the mouse wheel up or down. For clarity reasons some map elements are hidden while viewing at a large scale but revealed after zooming in.
  • You can easily navigate through the map by dragging it with the mouse pointer. After a double click, the clicked-on position is displayed in the centre of the map.
  • The maps feature an advanced geographical and thematical search function that locates strings of characters.
  • When clicking the 'Overview' button a useful overview map appears in an extra window at the top left corner of the screen.
  • A legend is provided for each map.
  • You can also search thematically for data by clicking the 'Lists' button. The map will centre on the requested map element and automatically a table will appear with additional information on the map element.
  • The same additional information on map elements can be retrieved by clicking on the item directly on the map itself (the mouse pointer should change in a hand first).
Please note the following:
  • ‘Mayi-Mayi’ map: when clicking on a ‘Mayi-Mayi’ symbol directly on the map, only one table will appear for that specific place, i.e. a table with information on only one Mayi-Mayi group. In some cases though, in one place more than one group is present, or, when a village with Mayi-Mayi presence could not be located, the information on it was attached to the capital of the territory (e.g. Mitwaba). You can retrieve the complete information on all the Mayi-Mayi groups connected with a specific place by choosing the ‘Lists’ function on the screen below.
  • ‘Incidents’ map: when clicking on an ‘Incident’ symbol directly on the map, only one table will appear for that specific place, i.e. a table with information on only one incident, while in some cases in one place more than one incident took place. You can retrieve the complete information on all the incidents in a specific place by choosing the ‘Lists’ function on the screen below.


View the web maps




December 2007-May 2008

This report is the second in a series of updates following the initial report of June 2007 “Mapping Interests in Conflict Areas: Katanga” (for the first update, see below).


1) The briefing paper

A PDF version of the paper is available below. If you want to open it in a separate window, right click on the hyperlink.

Read the paper (English) (PDF, 475 kB)

Pour lire le rapport (français) (PDF, 494 kB)



2) The web maps

We have published an updated version of the FARDC and Mayi-Mayi maps. For this update, because of the preponderant role of natural resources as a motivating factor for the armed groups and the FARDC, we decided to produce a web map combining the maps ‘Conflict actors’ and ‘Natural resources’. On this map, only the most important minerals were now selected and a layer ‘Fourth category natural resources’ was created to replace the ‘Other resources’ with their generic symbol.
The new Incidents map shows the important security incidents involving armed groups or FARDC for the period November/December 2007 to April/May 2008.
For reasons explained in the report, in this update our information on positions and incidents of the Mitwaba territory is more detailed than that of the other Katangese territories.

On all the maps secondary rivers (streams), minor roads and the limits of sectors/chiefdoms were added.
Due to the lack of reliable and complete cartographical data, the location of the following places is approximate: Kisengo, Kilunga (‘Natural resources’ and ‘Incidents’), Kintya (‘FARDC’ and ‘Incidents’), Shamwana (‘Mayi-Mayi’). Information regarding other places that could not be located was attached to the capital of the territory, or to a known place close-by.


The link below will lead you to a webpage with 5 different maps that can be selected from the drop down menu on the right side of the screen.

Instructions for use: see above


Please note the following:

  • ‘Mayi-Mayi’ map: when clicking on a ‘Mayi-Mayi’ symbol directly on the map, only one table will appear for that specific place, i.e. a table with information on only one Mayi-Mayi group. In some cases though, in one place more than one group is present, or, when a village with Mayi-Mayi presence could not be located, the information on it was attached to the capital of the territory (e.g. Mitwaba). You can retrieve the complete information on all the Mayi-Mayi groups connected with a specific place by choosing the ‘Lists’ function on the screen below.
  • ‘Incidents’ map: when clicking on an ‘Incident’ symbol directly on the map, only one table will appear for that specific place, i.e. a table with information on only one incident, while in some cases in one place more than one incident took place. You can retrieve the complete information on all the incidents in a specific place by choosing the ‘Lists’ function on the screen below.
  • When clicking on a symbol in a specific map, it may happen that an information table from another map shows up. In that case, click on your browser’s ‘Refresh’ button, go back to the chosen map and try again.

 


View the web maps




September-November 2007

This report is the first in a series of updates following the initial report of June 2007 "Mapping Interests in Conflict Areas: Katanga”.

It shows that, although the level of conflict there is less intense, also the Katanga province is far from stable. Mayi-Mayi rebel groups, local communities, indigenous people and the regular army (FARDC) compete over the access to sources of income.

1) The briefing paper

A PDF version of the paper is available below. If you want to open it in a separate window, right click on the hyperlink.

Read the paper (English) (PDF, 270 kB)
Pour lire le rapport (français) (PDF, 282 kB)



2) The maps

We have published an updated version of the ‘FARDC’, ‘Mayi-Mayi’, ‘DDR’ and ‘Conflict actors’ (previously ‘Conflict’) maps. The new ‘Incidents’ map is completely different from the previous one and shows the important security incidents involving armed groups or FARDC for the period September-November 2007. Recently discovered mining areas that have become a security issue have been added to the ‘Natural resources’ map. Some new publications have been added as hyperlinks to the ‘Reports’ map.
Due to the lack of accurate and complete cartographic data, the location of the following places is approximate: Kisengo and Kilunga (‘Natural resources’), Kapingu (‘Conflict actors’) and Bulongo (‘Incidents’).


a. Web maps

The link below will lead you to a webpage with 7 different maps that can be selected from the drop down menu on the right side of the screen.

Instructions for use: see above


Please note the following:

  • ‘DDR’ map: when clicking on a DDR symbol directly on the map, a DDR summary table will appear for that specific place. You can retrieve information on every separate demobilised group in that place by choosing the ‘Lists’ function on the screen below.
  • ‘Incidents’ map: when clicking on an ‘Incident’ symbol directly on the map, only one table will appear for that specific place, i.e. a table with information on only one incident, while in some cases in one place more than one incident took place. You can retrieve the complete information on all the incidents in a specific place by choosing the ‘Lists’ function on the screen below.
  • ‘Reports’ map: when clicking on a blue ‘info’ symbol on the map, a window with only one report regarding that specific place will open up, while usually more than one report is available. You will find links to all the relevant reports by choosing the ‘Lists’ function on the screen below.
  • When clicking on a symbol in a specific map, it may happen that an information table from another map shows up. In that case, click on your browser’s ‘Refresh’ button, go back to the chosen map and try again.

 


View the web maps


b. PDF maps

The links below lead you to two PDF maps at scale 1:3,000,000, one of the North of Katanga, the other comprising the Copperbelt, the Centre and the East.

These PDF maps present a series of ‘layers’, containing the different features of the web maps mentioned above. The maps are truly interactive: the user can switch on (visualise) or off (hide) the different layers, making his own feature combinations. On the other hand, the PDF maps do not have search functions or lists and do not allow click actions on map objects.

A complete legend of all the map features is provided as well.

To view the PDF maps with the different layers you need Adobe© Reader© version 6.0 or later. You can download the program for free from the Adobe© website.
 
View the PDF maps:
North (7436 kB)
Copperbelt – Centre – East (3211 kB)

Legend (92 kB)



  

                              

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